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THE EUROPEAN UNION MUST BE A CLIMATE LEADER IN PARIS


The European Union - the third-largest emitter of greenhouse gases - prides itself on being a world leader on climate change, particularly with regards to renewable energy consumption.
 

EU Member States must show the political leadership needed by Europe and its allies, and to create an agreement in Paris that facilitates the transition towards an industrial, and economic revolution that will provide for both people and the planet.
 

WWF'S ASKS TO THE EU

 
  • Rebuild international partnerships to increase influence and climate ambition


Traditionally, the EU has been considered a leader on climate action within the UNFCCC. The EU must reinvigorate this role and use its position to encourage other developed nations to increase their climate ambition.  

The EU must also rebuild partnerships with climate action allies, such as Less Developed Countries and Island States, and work to ensure that all vulnerable nations have access to means of implementation including climate finance, capacity building, and technology in order to help those most vulnerable achieve their mitigation and adaptation actions.

 

  • Advocate for robust accounting rules to enhance transparency and comparability


The EU must work to ensure that the Paris Agreement includes a robust accounting and transparency framework, along with clear principles of transparency, accuracy, consistency, completeness and comparability, in order to ensure confidence in the global UNFCCC system beyond Paris.
 

  • Step up domestic action to establish international credibility


The EU’s 2030 climate and energy framework, which was agreed by the European Council in October 2014 and which forms the basis the EU’s INDC, must still be implemented by agreeing further EU legislation.

However, the European Commission has stated that a positive 2015 global climate agreement in Paris could enable the EU to increase its GHG reduction target for 2030 beyond the current ‘at least 40%’ goal.

The EU should give further clarity on exactly how it would deliver additional emission reductions following a successful conclusion to the Paris COP, both before and after 2020. 

EU WEAKENS ITS ALLIANCE WITH VULNERABLE COUNTRIES

The EU position on climate finance for COP21 was adopted on 10 November by the EU Finance Ministers. Unfortunately, it falls short of what is needed to deliver a strong deal in Paris that empowers the world’s poor to cope with the current and future impacts of climate change and to develop in a less polluting way so that their carbon emissions don’t add to the climate change problem.

Read WWF's reactive statement

EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT PROVIDES MORE CLARITY ON EU'S PARIS CLIMATE POSITION

On 14 October, the European Parliament provided needed clarity on how Europe itself intends to contribute to deeper greenhouse gas emission reductions, and a fair share of international climate finance.

Read WWF's media advisory

EU’S CLIMATE HOMEWORK NOT DONE YET

On 18 September European Environment Ministers adopted the EU’s position for the UN Climate Change conference (COP21) - the most significant international climate negotiations since 2009 in Copenhagen - that will be held in Paris at the end of the year.

Read WWF's reactive statement

EU: PUT WEIGHT BEHIND RENEWABLES

“100% RENEWABLES: PEOPLE POWER, CLIMATE SOLUTIONS”