Turn up the volume of Nature | WWF

Europe has an immense heritage of natural areas and species: virgin forests like Bialowieza in Poland, beautiful lakes, oceans, rivers and wetlands like Doñana in Spain, and thousands of unique animals, such as lynxwolves, bears, turtles and whales. 

Spending time in nature and appreciating the richness of its sounds bring also enormous benefits to our health and wellbeing. Thank you for helping save it! 61.801 people turned up the volume of nature. Together we created 327 hours of nature sounds - almost two weeks worth of songs like the one below.



Together with #NatureAlert coalition WWF campaigned for nearly two years not to reopen the Directives. With your help we succeeded! On 7th December 2016 the EU Commission declared the EU Nature Directives fit for purpose.

To improve their implementations the Commission will develop an Action plan. We will continue to follow and engage with the EU Commission to make sure Europe's beauties of nature are there for the generations to come.

Europe's amazing nature

© Think Digital / WWF
© Think Digital / WWF

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