Cement sector can cut 90% of projected emissions | WWF

Cement sector can cut 90% of projected emissions

Posted on 02 December 2008
"Reducing emissions in major polluting sectors like cement is about technology action and policy regulation which creates strong incentives in developing countries." Damien Demailly, Energy Officer, WWF-France
© KVDP
Poznan, Poland – The global cement industry can avoid up to 90% of emissions projected under a frozen technology scenario, according to a new WWF report.

A blueprint for a climate friendly cement industry says that the highly energy intensive industry, responsible for 8% of global emissions, has the tools available to reduce its carbon footprint while continuing its forecast growth.

“Cement companies do not suffer from a shortage of options to reduce their climate impact,” said Oliver Rapf, Head of WWF’s Climate Business Engagement Unit.

“The solutions proposed in WWF’s new report can help the industry move in the right direction, setting targets and taking action that will lead to deep cuts in emissions quickly.”

The report finds reduction potentials through a more efficient use of cement and by increasing the amount of additives and substitutes. Large energy efficiency potentials have been found both to conserve thermal and electrical energy in the production process.

As vital as the setting of technical directions and standards for industry is to have a supporting policy framework from governments of both industrialised and developing countries.

“There is a booming global demand for construction materials and nowhere is this more visible than in emerging economies”, said Dongmei Chen, Director of WWF China’s Climate Change and Energy Programme.

“Our report proves that it is possible to disassociate economic growth from increased greenhouse gas emissions. This is a valuable lesson for industry and politics, especially when discussing development in emerging economies like China.”

WWF announced the findings on the eve of discussions about sectoral approaches for greenhouse gas reductions, taking place at the UN climate talks in Poznan this month.

"Reducing emissions in major polluting sectors like cement is about technology action and policy regulation which creates strong incentives in developing countries", said Damien Demailly, Energy Officer at WWF-France. “We need leadership by industrialized countries and a proactive approach by industry to tap the massive reduction potentials revealed by WWF’s analysis.”

Contacts: Christian Teriete (English, German), +48 793 489 334 (Poznan number), +852 9310 6805 (Hong Kong mobile), cteriete@wwf.org.hk; Martin Hiller (English, German, French), +48 793 489 340 (Poznan number), +41 79 347 2256 (Swiss mobile), mhiller@wwfint.org; Tati Guedes (English, German, Portuguese), +61404738005 (Australian mobile), tguedes@wwf.org.au

Spokespeople: Oliver Rapf, Head of WWF’s Climate Business Engagement Unit, +32 494 307 485 (Belgian mobile), orapf@wwfepo.org; Damien Demailly, Energy Officer, WWF France, +48 793 489 258 (Poznan number), ddemailly@wwf.fr. The lead-author of the report is also in Poznan and can answer questions by media about the detailed findings of his work.


Editor’s notes:

This report was produced by WWF’s Climate Savers programme with the support of its corporate partner Lafarge. Founded in 1999, the Climate Savers programme currently comprises 18 major international companies, reducing their total emissions by over 14 million tons of CO2 per year compared to reference scenarios. For more information go to: http//:www.panda.org/climatesavers

The summary and the full report can be downloaded at: http//:www.panda.org/climatesavers

About WWF

WWF is one of the world's largest and most respected independent conservation organizations, with almost 5 million supporters and a global network active in over 100 countries. WWF's mission is to stop the degradation of the earth's natural environment and to build a future in which humans live in harmony with nature, by conserving the world's biological diversity, ensuring that the use of renewable natural resources is sustainable, and promoting the reduction of pollution and wasteful consumption.

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"Reducing emissions in major polluting sectors like cement is about technology action and policy regulation which creates strong incentives in developing countries." Damien Demailly, Energy Officer, WWF-France
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