MEPs support sustainable development goals through plan on poverty | WWF

MEPs support sustainable development goals through plan on poverty

Posted on 14 February 2017    
Women on Mafia Island prepare fish caught along the Mafia Coastline in Tanzania for selling. The Rumaki Seascape programme has helped empower communities in Kilwa, Rufiji and Mafia to participate in the management of their marine resources and protect threatened habitats and species.
© WWF / John Kabubu
Brussels, 14 February 2017 

The European Parliament today voted in favour of a well-rounded development strategy which addresses the many root causes of poverty.


“Prosperity and well-being go hand in hand with a clean and healthy natural world. MEPs have have shown today that they understand this”, said Sally Nicholson, Head of Development Policy and Finance at WWF European Policy Office.
“From the environment to equality, every aspect of the 2030 Sustainable Development Agenda plays a role in ending poverty. We hope that this sustainable thinking will now be applied to other EU policy areas.”

The Parliament’s report on the European Consensus for Development also refers to the EU’s commitment to mobilise resources for climate action in developing countries. A healthy environment and a stable climate can help eradicate poverty in many ways:
  • The sustainable management of oceans contributes to  food security and secures coastal livelihoods.
  • On the other hand, the depletion of natural resources and environmental degradation impacts on agricultural productivity and undermines economic opportunities
  • Climate change is already impacting water distribution and availability, biodiversity and ecosystems, and thus people’s livelihoods, and well-being.
“The next step is to do more to tackle the impacts of the EU’s consumption beyond its borders. For example, in South America vast swathes of forest are cleared daily to feed the EU’s soy habit - each EU citizen consumes about 61 kg every year, mostly indirectly through meat from soy-fed animals,” said Nicholson.

“The EU needs to look at the full supply chain and see how production and consumption can be made better and more sustainable. Through development cooperation, one way to do this is by scaling up support for sustainable consumption programmes such as Switch Asia, Switch Africa and Switch Med.”

The EU Foreign Affairs Council is expected to adopt conclusions on the revision of the Development Consensus in May 2017.

Contact:
Sally Nicholson
Head of Development Policy and Finance, WWF European Policy Office
snicholson@wwf.eu
Tel: +32 2 740 09 37

Sarah Azau
Communication Officer, WWF European Policy Office
sazau@wwf.eu
Tel: +32 473 57 31 37

Website: www.wwf.eu
Twitter: @WWFEU
Women on Mafia Island prepare fish caught along the Mafia Coastline in Tanzania for selling. The Rumaki Seascape programme has helped empower communities in Kilwa, Rufiji and Mafia to participate in the management of their marine resources and protect threatened habitats and species.
© WWF / John Kabubu Enlarge