Combating climate change impacts in Asia-Pacific | WWF

Combating climate change impacts in Asia-Pacific

Posted on 07 November 2007
Fiji is famous throughout the world for spectacularly rich and vibrant soft coral reefs, which provide havens and food sources for thousands of species of fish and invertebrates.
© WWF / Cat Holloway
Climate change is now recognised as one of the biggest threats to human development. Impacts are seen through changes to the diverse natural environments around the world, exacerbating droughts, floods, sea level rise, glacial melt and storms. They will be increasingly felt across all societies and economies.

Developing countries which bear the least historical responsibility for the problem will be the most vulnerable, the most hard hit and have the least capacity to adapt to these impacts.

WWF believes it is important that these countries are not only equipped to cope with the impacts but also are able to fully engage with the international processes set up to address this critical global problem.

With the support of the European Union, WWF is carrying out projects in four developing countries in Asia and the Pacific (Tuvalu, Cook Islands, Nepal and Indonesia). WWF is working with governments and civil society to enhance their participation in climate change negotiations at the international level and to provide climate change solutions at the national level.
Fiji is famous throughout the world for spectacularly rich and vibrant soft coral reefs, which provide havens and food sources for thousands of species of fish and invertebrates.
© WWF / Cat Holloway Enlarge